Editorials

Hollywood Wants Female-Led Action Films…Audiences Don’t.

With films such as Charlie Angels currently tracking below a 15 million dollar opening weekend on a production budget of 50 million, you wonder how much more money does Hollywood need to lose before they get the picture? The answer? A lot more.

The latest female-led action flick to hit theaters is the new woke reboot of Charlie’s Angels set to release in theaters this week. Looking at the early box office tracking for that film shows that audiences are not hyped for the girl power action film. Under normal circumstances, this would be a message to Hollywood that moviegoers are not interested in this current wave of progressive female-led action films but as Terminator Dark Fate has proven, Hollywood would rather lose hundreds of millions of dollars than give up on their cultural agenda.

“The future is female!” is the motto Hollywood has adopted since kingpin Harvey Weinstein was publicly exposed for exchanging sex with women in the industry for fame and fortune. Now the same industry that knew about his crimes and enabled him for decades are now positioning themselves as the leaders of a new female-led revolution. A revolution that is replacing male-led franchises with women. A revolution that is rewriting franchises to match their progressive ideology but most important, a revolution that is providing films that audiences do not want to see.

For every Captain Marvel, there have been dozens of female-led films in the last couple of years that haven’t matched the excitement of audiences that comes from its creators, especially financially. Here is a list of Hollywood’s recent failures to feminize franchises.

 

 

Terminator: Dark Fate

Linda Hamilton, Natalia Reyes, and Mackenzie Davis in Terminator: Dark Fate (2019)

Production Budget: 200 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 200 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 100 Million Dollars

 

 

Anna

Sasha Luss in Anna (2019)

Production Budget: 30 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 30 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 30 Million Dollars

 

 

 

Men In Black International

Tessa Thompson in Men in Black: International (2019)

Production Budget: 110 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 250 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 50 Million Dollars

 

 

 

X-Men: Dark Phoenix

Jessica Chastain and Sophie Turner in Dark Phoenix (2019)

Production Budget: 200 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 250 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 170 Million Dollars

 

 

 

Miss Bala

Production Budget: 15 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 15 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 15 Million Dollars

 

 

 

Black and Blue

Naomie Harris and Tyrese Gibson in Black and Blue (2019)

Production Budget: 12 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 19 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 10 Million Dollars

 

 

Alita: Battle Angel

Rosa Salazar in Alita: Battle Angel (2019)

Production Budget: 170 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 400 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 53 Million Dollars

 

 

Tomb Raider 

Alicia Vikander in Tomb Raider (2018)

Production Budget: 110 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 250 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 25 Million Dollars

 

 

 

Proud Mary

Taraji P. Henson in Proud Mary (2018)

Production Budget: 30 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 21 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 40 Million Dollars

 

 

The Kitchen

Elisabeth Moss, Melissa McCarthy, and Tiffany Haddish in The Kitchen (2019)

Production Budget: 40 Million Dollars

Global Box Office Gross: 16 Million Dollars

Projected Loss: 50 Million Dollars

 

 

 

With films such as Charlie Angels currently tracking below a 15 million dollar opening weekend on a production budget of 50 million, you wonder how much more money does Hollywood need to lose before they get the picture? The answer? A lot more.

 

 

 

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15 comments on “Hollywood Wants Female-Led Action Films…Audiences Don’t.

  1. I actually lied Alita: Battle Angel. But that’s just my personal opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ‘liked’

      Like

    • So did I. It was based on a classic Japanese manga with a female protagonist. NOT a story where there was a male protagonist re-imagined as a female. A plus is that the Japanese can do powerful female characters far better than western producers because their culture is actually anti-feminist.

      Like

    • Alita was good until the stupid melodrama with that douche started. Overall a pretty bad movie though.

      Like

  2. I was a big fan of the 2000 version of Charlie’s Angels – which adopted the Japanese “tongue in cheek” approach of powerful women (see Dirty Pair) who also happened to have boyfriend trouble, were cute, sexy and funny and had to struggle to win. I assumed it had made money, but instead it proves the assertion of the article here. It lost at least 30 million.

    Like

  3. Darth__KEK

    You also forgot about GHOST IN THE SHELL.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Fake news. Once you correct for the gender pay gap, all these films made millions in profits.

    Like

  5. Jonathan "How You Like Dem Apples"

    I think we need more movies like this. More movies with 5’5″ skinny women wearing panda-eye make-up and high heels beating up 6’3″ male MMA-looking fighters. Women see it and think they too can do in real life what movies show. I practically live on liveleak and worldstar for my entertainment.

    Like

  6. Tony Debenham

    The simple fact is that male audience goers like male action heroes to look up to and want to be like, and female audience goers like male action heroes to want to be with.
    Nobody male or female wants to see film after film of man hating, self empowered and over opinionated women pretending that they don’t need men for anything.
    It’s not entertainment. It’s just depressing and that’s why audiences are not turning up.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Personally I am willing to accept a female action movie, if they are not man-hating feminists.

    Like

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