Tag: Guest Review

Phantom Thread (Guest Review Featuring Nick Kush)

Set in the glamour of 1950’s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock’s life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover.

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Call Me By Your Name (Guest Review Ft. KeithLovesMovies)

It’s the summer of 1983, and precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman is spending the days with his family at their 17th-century villa in Lombardy, Italy. He soon meets Oliver, a handsome doctoral student who’s working as an intern for Elio’s father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of their surroundings, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.

The Shape of Water (Guest Review ft. Amari Sali)

Last year, Amari Sali from Wherever I Look reviewed an Oscar-nominated film Fences, this time he is back to review another academy award nominated film The Shape of Water. The Shape of Water will remind you of the days when fantasy films weren’t made to set up trilogies but simply tell a stand alone, gorgeous story.

Ghost In The Shell (Guest Review Ft. JasonsMovieBlog)

Ghost in the Shell is a step in the right direction for Hollywood in adapting anime movies into live-action features films, opening up the possibilities for better translations and erasing bad memories of some past endeavors (see Dragonball: Evolution). So, I just have this left to say…. I am Jason and I give me consent for you to like and comment on my review of Ghost in the Shell.

Lion (Guest Review Ft. Movie Man Jackson)

It may be the editing, which isn’t perfect in the first half, but adequate. In the second half, elapsed time isn’t clearly defined, and some character introductions/relationships/reintroductions are a little clunky as a result. Chemistry between Patel and Rooney Mara is average. The scenes they share extensively together (not a ton) is when Lion becomes a tad clichéd and its pace compromised

But even with that, Lion does a lot more to be legitimately emotional than the average solely Oscar-centric movie. In simplicity, a moving tale is found.

Beauty and the Beast (Guest Review Ft. KeithLovesMovies)

Overall, this was a good adaptation of the animated classic that stayed true to the source material. While the film took advantage of its budget, the overproduction of the musical numbers often did more harm than good. The film depended on the relationship between Belle and the Beast’s but it wasn’t the most believable because of the lack of development and chemistry between Emma Watson and Dan Stevens.

Manchester by the Sea (Guest Review ft. ScreenZealots)

While it’s a genuine look at the grieving process, I wanted this movie to be so much better than it actually is. I feel Affleck’s incredible performance is clouding everyone’s opinion of this film and if they’d simply take a step back, they’d notice the multitude of aspects that don’t work, like classical music used for the score and the poor direction that feels more like a Robert Altman rip-off than a sincere, original style.

Fences (Guest Review ft. Amari Sali)

A film which makes you think, reflect, and feel. I don’t feel like I watch enough of those. So when films like this come along, it is like cleaning your palate. It is like, being reminded of what a quality drama can be, and how from the old to the young, it isn’t unfair to expect every character to make an effort to not just connect with you but to make you feel something. Now, I might not have cried like I thought I would, but damn if this doesn’t put some perspective on your life, maybe your daddy’s life, and make you contemplate on your way home what you going to do about your life.

Moonlight (Guest Review ft. CineMuseFilms)

Moonlight has more in common with impressionist paintings than modern cinema. It is soft-focused and visceral. It is not about race or sexuality or masculinity, yet it takes us into those spaces to experience the film rather than just watch. It defies holistic labels and compels engagement with its fragments. You do not see this film for entertainment but to share a journey into darkness to find light.